Water Stargrass

Water Stargrass

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically raking water stargrass and pulling up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant. Water stargrass can re-grow from any roots that remain. Herbicide Control: There are a few options for controlling water stargrass: Spritflo (for ponds with no outflow) – liquid that is poured into the pond…

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Bur Reed

Bur Reed

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting bur reed and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant, but bur reed can regrow from any remaining roots or seeds. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant can partially control bur reed. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Thoroughly wetting…

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Frog’s Bit

Frogs Bit

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting frog’s bit and digging up the stolons (modified stems that act as roots) can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant, but physical control can be difficult. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control frog’s bit. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Another…

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Spatterdock, Cow Lily

Spatterdock (Cow Lily)

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting spatterdock and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant, but spatterdock can regrow from any remaining roots or seeds. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control spatterdock. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Thoroughly wetting the plants in…

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Arrowhead

Arrowhead (Bull Tongue)

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting arrowhead and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant, but arrowhead can regrow from any remaining roots or seeds. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control arrowhead. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Another product that will control…

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Pickerelweed

Pickerelweed

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting pickerelweed and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant. Pickerelweed can re-grow from roots that remain or from seeds left behind. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control pickerelweed. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Thoroughly wetting the…

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Parrot’s Feather

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically raking parrot’s feather and pulling up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant. Parrot’s feather can re-grow from roots or fragments that remain. Herbicide Control: There are multiple options for controlling parrot’s feather: Dibrox herbicide – liquid that is diluted with water and sprayed right on…

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Floating Primrose

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting floating primrose and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant. Floating primrose can re-grow from roots that remain or from seeds left behind. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control floating primrose. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control.…

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Bulrush

Bulrush

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting bulrushes and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant, but bulrushes can regrow from any remaining roots or seeds. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant will effectively control bulrush. These products together are called our Cattail and Water Lily Control. Thoroughly wetting…

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Purple Loosestrife

Purple Loosestrife

Manual/ Mechanical Control: Physically cutting purple loosestrife and digging up the roots can be a somewhat successful way to manage this plant. Purple loosestrife plants can produce millions of seeds per year, and the seeds can germinate immediately or lay dormant for multiple years before sprouting. Herbicide Control: Imox herbicide and a surfactant can partially control purple loosestrife.…

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Phragmites

Phragmites

Phragmites, also known as the common reed, is a large perennial grass typically found in temperate and tropical regions. Phragmites were at one point considered an invasive and exotic species in North America, however, recent evidence has shown that the plants are actually native. Phragmites can sometimes be difficult to control. We recommend first trying…

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Watershield

Watershield (Dollar Bonnet)

Watershield is a rooted plant that floats on the surface similar to water lilies. However, the leaves of watershield are much smaller than those of water lilies. Watershield leaves are typically between one inch and two inches across. Early in the season, Navigate is an effective control solution. However, as the season progresses, watershield will…

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Water Lily

Waterlily

We recommend using Glyposate 5.4 and a surfactant for easy control of water lilies. Check out our Water Lily Control products. Water lilies are colonial plants rising from creeping stems called rhizomes, like a branching shrub on its side. The creeping rootstock of underground rhizomes is one means of reproduction to rapidly spread water lilies…

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Cattail

Cattails

Cattails can quickly ruin a pond’s visual and recreational benefits. Control is best achieved through disruption of the root system. Cutting cattails 2 or 3 inches under the waterline 2 or 3 times to drown them can actually stimulate them if done in May. Pulling them out by the roots can be impractical. We recommend…

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Water Lettuce

Water Lettuce

Water lettuce is an invasive plant that is commonly found in the southeast region of the United States. It has been known to clog waterways, making fishing, boating, and swimming difficult in affected areas. The plants grow in expansive mats that block sunlight to submerged aquatic plants, leading to lowered levels of bio-diversity. Water lettuce…

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Water Hyacinth

Water Hyacinth

Water Hyacinth is one of the fastest growing plants known. Its primary means of reproduction is by way of runners or stolons, which eventually form daughter plants. It also produces large quantities of seeds that are viable for up to 30 years. Because of water hyacinth’s ability to quickly reproduce, populations often double in size…

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